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I am neither especially clever nor especially gifted. I am only very, very curious.

Treating Mortons Neuroma

Overview

interdigital neuromaA Morton?s Neuroma is actually incorrectly termed, with the name suggesting it is a tumour or growth. Rather than a true neuroma it is actually what is called a perineural fibrosis, which means that over time the sheath surrounding the nerve becomes irritated, inflamed, and forms a thickened scar tissue.

Causes

A Morton's neuroma commonly occurs due to repetitive weight bearing activity (such as walking or running) particularly when combined with tight fitting shoes or excessive pronation of the feet (i.e. "flat-feet"). The condition is also more common in patients with an unstable forefoot allowing excessive movement between the metatarsal bones. A Morton's neuroma can also occur due to certain foot deformities, trauma to the foot, or the presence of a ganglion or inflamed bursa in the region which may place compressive forces on the nerve.

Symptoms

What are the symptoms of Morton?s neuroma? A sharp or stinging pain between the toes when standing or walking. Pain in the forefoot between the toes. Swelling between the toes. Tingling (?pins and needles?) and numbness. Feeling like there is a ?bunched up sock? or a pebble or marble under the ball of the foot.

Diagnosis

You should visit a doctor or podiatrist (foot doctor) if you have pain or tingling that does not stop. Your health care provider will examine your feet and will apply pressure on the spaces between the bones of the toes to determine the location of the foot pain. The doctor may order X-rays to rule out other conditions associated with foot pain, such as a stress fracture or arthritis. X-rays alone will not show whether or not a neuroma is present, so an ultrasound scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. A diagnostic procedure called an electromyography is sometimes used to rule out nerve conditions that may cause symptoms like those of associated with Morton?s neuroma.

Non Surgical Treatment

Treatment for Morton?s Neuroma usually begins conservatively, with a change in lifestyle choices. People suffering from the condition may find pain relief by reducing activity levels, changing footwear, using orthopedic supports, reducing weight. Medications are also available to help relieve the pain of Morton?s Neuroma. Over-the-counter medications are sometimes very helpful in reducing pain and inflammation. Your health care provider can also provide you with anesthetic or corticosteroid injections. These help to numb the area affected by the neuroma, and reduce inflammation.intermetatarsal neuroma

Surgical Treatment

Surgery may be considered in patients who have not responded adequately to non-surgical treatments. Your foot and ankle surgeon will determine the approach that is best for your condition. The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure performed. Regardless of whether you?ve undergone surgical or nonsurgical treatment, your surgeon will recommend long-term measures to help keep your symptoms from returning. These include appropriate footwear and modification of activities to reduce the repetitive pressure on the foot.
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